Tag Archives: The Engagement Formula

The News about Employee Engagement: It’s all Good!

When employees are engaged with their work, good things happen. I haven’t read of heard of one negative thing that’s happened as a result of employees giving all their energy, creativity and passion to performing their jobs. Rather, engaged employees create a competitive edge for their company that can’t be easily copied—they’re constantly making innovative improvements to products, services and customer experiences while providing superior levels of customer service which results in loyal customers. This means higher levels of repeat and referral business which, in turn, translates into significant increases in market share. In addition, companies with high levels of employee engagement enjoy substantial cost savings due to reduced employee turnover, absenteeism, accidents and employee theft. Clearly, having a workforce of employees that are engaged is a very good thing. if you want to know how to make employee engagement happen in your organization, just go to www.rossreck.com.

One More Time: How do You Motivate People at Work?

The truth of the matter is that it’s impossible to motivate people at work. The reason is: they’re already motivated. They come to work every day motivated to pursue their self-interest—the satisfaction of needs that are important to them. The only thing the leadership of a business can do if it wants its employees to perform at a high level is to engage the motivation that’s already there—to create a situation where the harder people work toward pursuing the satisfaction of their own needs, the harder they work toward the goals of the organization. Companies with a high level of employee engagement understand this. Instead of trying to motivate their employees with traditional means like authority, rewards and punishment, they’ve created environments where employees are free to be themselves, have fun and follow their passion (the motivation that’s already there inside them). This is why the underlying managerial philosophy at SAS is: “Give people the tools they need to do their job and then get out of their way.” At W. L. Gore & Associates, there are no titles, no orders and no bosses. As company founder Bill Gore once said, “We don’t manage people here, they manage themselves.”

 

What Employee Engagement Experts Can and Cannot do

The experts are very good at two things when comes to employee engagement: talking about it and and measuring it. What they can’t do is tell you how to make it happen in your company or organization. This is why the global level of employee engagement has hovered around 30 percent during the last several years and is not improving. My latest book, The Engagement Formula, contains a new leadership model that guarantees full (100%) employee engagement. If you’re interested in learning about it, here’s the link: http://rossreck.com/

A Quick Story About Positive Affirmation and Revenue

This very powerful story was sent to my by a friend of mine and I’d like to share it with you.

“The last company I worked for was strong for the first few years and then started declining once we took on investor money and got away from our core values. At one point, the founder (no longer the CEO at this point) sent me 2 graphs. One was titled “Revenue”, and the other did not have a title. The 2 charts were very similar. They had spikes around the same times and dips around the same times. He asked me what I thought the second graph was, and I could not figure it out for the life of me. Finally, he told me that the second chart was the number of posts on the ‘iRock Board.’ The iRock Board was a little module that I added to our in-house software that allowed employees to post messages about coworkers that went above and beyond. The 2 graphs showed that when our employees were posting lots of compliments, revenue went up. When the iRock posts started to decline, so did our revenue.

Kind-of makes you think… :-) .”

The Key Reasons why Engaged and Disengaged Employees Stay with Their Organizations

BlessingWhite, in their 2011 Employee Engagement Report,listed a finding that was particularly intriguing: engaged employees plan to stay at their current organizations because of what they can give. Disengaged employees, on the other hand, stay because of what they can get. This says very clearly that employee engagement is not just about money. It’s more about being able to make a valued contribution to something that matters.

Why the Level of Employee Engagement is Not Improving

Recent studies by major HR consulting firms have shown that the level of employee engagement is somewhere around 30 percent and it hasn’t improved in recent years. The reason that is hasn’t improved is that the overwhelming majority of businesses insist on using a management model that actually prevents employees from becoming engaged with their work. It’s often referred to a Management by the Numbers or Management by Command and Control. As Douglas McGregor, author of The Human Side of Enterprise, put it more than a half-century ago, the implicit logic to this method is “…that in order to get people to direct their efforts toward organizational objectives, management must tell them what to do, judge how well they have done, and reward or punish them accordingly.” The problem with this method is that it turns employees off–they strongly resent being told what to do, how to do it and then being judged by how well they did it by a boss or manager. When employees are turned off, they cannot become engaged with their work. This is why Management by the Numbers prevents people from becoming engaged.

As Einstein once said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” Continuing to use a management model that turns employees off is not going to improve the level of employee engagement. As McGregor put it, “The real need is for new theory, changed assumptions, (and) more understanding of the nature of human behavior in organizational settings.”

My new book, The Engagement Formula, presents a leadership model that incorporates new theory, changed assumptions and more understanding of the nature of human behavior in organizational settings. The model consists of three simple steps that guarantee full (100 percent) employee engagement. http://rossreck.com/

Employee Engagement Isn’t Rocket Science; It’s Common Sense!

It seems like every time the business media features a company with high level of employee engagement, it refers to the company’s methodology for dealing with its employees as being new and innovative. In reality, all companies with a high level of employee engagement do the same basic things: They hire qualified people who mesh tightly with the company’s culture, they pay them well, treat them well and then get out of their way and let them do their job. In return for this special treatment, employees keep their company ahead of the curve when it comes to innovation and they see to it that the company’s customers are never disappointed. This results in higher levels of repeat and referral business which translates into significant increases in market share. This is pretty simple stuff when you think about it; not rocket science.

My new book, The Engagement Formula, provides a common sense blueprint that guarantees full employee engagement. If a business organization follows this blueprint, 100 percent of its employee will become engaged with their work–all working at their full potential. Think of what this could mean to the success of any business–profit or non-profit. For more information, please click on the following link: http://rossreck.com/

 

You Can’t Achieve a High Level of Employee Engagement by Paying Minimum Wage

Many business leaders today want to have it both ways: On one hand they want loyal hard working employees who are willing to do whatever it takes to make the business successful and, on the other hand, they want to pay them the least amount possible. The problem with this is that paying low wages creates distractions for employees which means they cannot give their full attention and effort to performing their jobs.  For example, if employees aren’t making enough money to support themselves, they will worry and fret over how they’re going to make ends meet which means they can’t give their full attention to performing their job.  This is why companies with a high level of employee engagement such as SAS, JetBlue, Google, NetApp and Southwest Airlines make it a point to provide their employees with compensation that is at or above their industry average and a benefit package that’s fairly generous.  They want to minimize these distractions so employees can focus on performing their jobs.  As stated on the SAS web site, “They (employees) should be freed from many of the distractions of day-to-day life, so they can focus on doing their best work.”  Similarly, Eric Schmidt, Executive Vice Chairman of Google had this to say when discussing Google’s philosophy regarding employee benefits.  “The goal is to strip away everything that gets in our employees’ way (of doing their best work).”

My new book, The Engagement Formula, details the role that equitable pay plays in achieving full employee engagement. For more information, please click on the following link: http://rossreck.com/

Understanding Human Motivation is the Key to Solving the Employee Engagement Problem

The fact that some people are engaged with their work while the vast majority of others aren’t tells us that employee engagement is all about all one thing— motivation. This brings up the age old question of what really motivates people. Given that thousands of books and articles that have been written on the subject of human motivation, one would think that we’d understand it much better than we do. In reality, the issue of what truly motivates people is quite simple. It’s something called self-interest—pursuing the satisfaction of needs that are important to them. Every single one of us comes into the world already programmed to pursue the satisfaction of a set of inborn needs. This how people are genetically wired—it’s part of our DNA. From birth to death, our behavior is completely defined by our pursuing the satisfaction of those needs.

This means that if you as a leader expect employees to get excited about giving all their energy, creativity and passion to performing their jobs, you have to accept the fact that they come to work already motivated to pursue their self-interest, not yours. Furthermore, no matter how hard you try or how much money you spend, you can’t change an individual’s self-interest to make it look like yours. The only thing you can do is accept it for what it is and engage it—you must find a way to connect their self-interest with the interests of the organization. This is what employee engagement is all about.

My new book, The Engagement Formula, shows you precisely how to connect employees’ self-interest with the interests of the organization.  It presents three simple steps that guarantee full employee engagement. For more information, please click on the following link: http://rossreck.com/

What We Don’t Know About Employee Engagement

We know a lot about employee engagement.  We know that it’s about getting employees excited about giving all their energy, creativity and passion to performing their jobs.  We also know that it’s the primary driver of financial performance of a business organization.  In addition, we think we know how to measure it.  Numerous consulting firms have employee surveys that are purported to measure the level of employee engagement at any particular business organization.  What we don’t know is how to create employee engagement.  This is evidenced by the fact that the level of employee engagement (world-wide) hovers around 30 and it’s not increasing.  If we knew how to make employee engagement happen, the level would be closer to 100 percent.

My new book, The Engagement Formula, solves this problem.  It presents three simple steps that guarantee full employee engagement.  If a business organization follows this formula, 100 percent of its employee will become engaged with their work–all working at their full potential. Think of what this could mean to the success of any business organization–profit or non-profit. For more information, please click on the following link: http://rossreck.com/